Shared by IRPO–NCDOT Helping with Evacuations, Opening Facility for Emergency Response Headquarters


Division 13 crews preparing for hurricane

RALEIGH – State transportation officials are helping with evacuations along the coast, readying emergency supplies and finalizing preparations for Hurricane Florence.

Ferries

The N.C. Department of Transportation’s Ferry Division evacuated 2,181 people and transported 1,074 vehicles from Ocracoke on the Hatteras, Cedar Island and Swan Quarter routes between 1 p.m. Monday and today when the last ferry left Ocracoke. The division suspended ferry operations from Ocracoke after Wednesday morning’s trips. All ferries are being placed in safe harbor and will be secured to different docks until conditions improve.

Highways

NCDOT staff in all 100 counties – including Division 13’s Burke, Rutherford, McDowell, Buncombe, Madison, Yancey and Mitchell counties – have prepared equipment for possible clearing efforts, shoulder repairs and crossline replacements that can be used in the aftermath of Hurricane Florence. A total of 2,166 employees in all 14 NCDOT divisions have been preparing for Hurricane Florence.

In some areas of North Carolina, crews have staged equipment in different areas so it can be available once cleanup and recovery begins. Generators have been checked and readied, and traffic services offices are staging message boards and loading emergency trailers with barricades, signs and drums. NCDOT staff have made arrangements to have contractors on standby ready to respond to any storm-related tasks such as cutting and removing downed trees from roads.

NCDOT is also preparing active transportation projects for potential impacts. Erosion and control measures have been checked and staff are making sure earth-moving equipment and cranes are secure.

Aviation

On the Outer Banks Monday, NCDOT staff flew drones from Hatteras north to Kitty Hawk at all traditional “hot spots” to obtain overhead video of pre-storm conditions. Fifteen NCDOT drones and multiple teams of pilots are being readied for post-event damage assessment.

The division is also monitoring the status of North Carolina’s public airports.

Global TransPark

Staff at the Global TransPark, an industrial park in Kinston and a division of the NCDOT, are preparing the facility to serve as a headquarters for emergency rescue and response operations in eastern North Carolina. By Wednesday, 1,500 federal and state emergency response personnel and military crews from North Carolina and the rest of the nation will be stationed at the Global TransPark. Team members with different skill sets will respond to emergency requests for help and be deployed to help clear roads, rescue people by water, land and air and support the operation.

The emergency rescue and response facility at the Global TransPark will be fully operational by Wednesday. In addition to housing emergency response crews, the facility also will be used to store thousands of emergency supplies, including rescue boats and aircraft, meals ready to eat, and medical supplies.

The Global TransPark also served as an incident command post for emergency response operations during the aftermath of Hurricane Matthew.

Division of Motor Vehicles

Thirty-one driver license offices in eastern North Carolina and some in central areas of the state were closed by noon Wednesday in preparation for Hurricane Florence. Road tests and mobile office visits were canceled in those affected areas. About 25 license plate offices were expected to close by the end of the day Wednesday and could remain closed for the rest of the week, depending on the weather.

Closures and changes to office hours can be found on the office locations page of the official NCDMV website at MyNCDMV.gov. Many DMV services, including renewing driver licenses, ordering duplicate ID cards or renewing vehicle registration, can be done online.

For real-time travel information, visit DriveNC.gov or follow NCDOT on Twitter.

***NCDOT***

Shared by IRPO–NCDOT Helping with Evacuations, Opening Facility for Response Headquarters

More than 230 employees ready in 10 westernmost counties (Division 14)

RALEIGH – State transportation officials are helping with evacuations along the coast, readying emergency supplies and finalizing preparations for Hurricane Florence.

Ferries

The N.C. Department of Transportation’s Ferry Division evacuated 2,181 people and transported 1,074 vehicles from Ocracoke on the Hatteras, Cedar Island and Swan Quarter routes between 1 p.m. Monday and today when the last ferry left Ocracoke. The division suspended ferry operations from Ocracoke after Wednesday morning’s trips. All ferries are being placed in safe harbor and will be secured to different docks until conditions improve.

Highways

NCDOT staff in all 100 counties have prepared equipment for possible clearing efforts, shoulder repairs and crossline replacements that can be used in the aftermath of Hurricane Florence. A total of 2,166 employees in all 14 NCDOT divisions have been preparing for Hurricane Florence.

In Division 14, which includes Cherokee, Clay, Graham, Haywood, Henderson, Jackson, Macon, Swain, Polk, and Transylvania counties, staff have 233 employees ready to respond with 137 chainsaws, 11 front-loaders, 10 bulldozers, 18 backhoes, 21 motor graders, 203 barricades, 114 road closed signs and 116 high water signs.

In some areas of North Carolina, crews have staged equipment in different areas so it can be available once cleanup and recovery begins. Generators have been checked and readied, and traffic services offices are staging message boards and loading emergency trailers with barricades, signs and drums. NCDOT staff have made arrangements to have contractors on standby ready to respond to any storm-related tasks such as cutting and removing downed trees from roads.

NCDOT is also preparing active transportation projects for potential impacts. Erosion and control measures have been checked and staff are making sure earth-moving equipment and cranes are secure.

Aviation

On the Outer Banks Monday, NCDOT staff flew drones from Hatteras north to Kitty Hawk at all traditional “hot spots” to obtain overhead video of pre-storm conditions. Fifteen NCDOT drones and multiple teams of pilots are being readied for post-event damage assessment.

The division is also monitoring the status of North Carolina’s public airports.

Global TransPark

Staff at the Global TransPark, an industrial park in Kinston and a division of the NCDOT, are preparing the facility to serve as a headquarters for emergency rescue and response operations in eastern North Carolina. By Wednesday, 1,500 federal and state emergency response personnel and military crews from North Carolina and the rest of the nation will be stationed at the Global TransPark. Team members with different skill sets will respond to emergency requests for help and be deployed to help clear roads, rescue people by water, land and air and support the operation.

The emergency rescue and response facility at the Global TransPark will be fully operational by Wednesday. In addition to housing emergency response crews, the facility also will be used to store thousands of emergency supplies, including rescue boats and aircraft, meals ready to eat, and medical supplies.

The Global TransPark also served as an incident command post for emergency response operations during the aftermath of Hurricane Matthew.

Division of Motor Vehicles

Thirty-one driver license offices in eastern North Carolina and some in central areas of the state were closed by noon Wednesday in preparation for Hurricane Florence. Road tests and mobile office visits were canceled in those affected areas. About 25 license plate offices were expected to close by the end of the day Wednesday and could remain closed for the rest of the week, depending on the weather.

Closures and changes to office hours can be found on the office locations page of the official NCDMV website at MyNCDMV.gov. Many DMV services, including renewing driver licenses, ordering duplicate ID cards or renewing vehicle registration, can be done online.

For real-time travel information, visit DriveNC.gov or follow NCDOT on Twitter.

***NCDOT***

Shared by IRPO–Don’t Fall Behind in Keeping North Carolina Clean!


Statewide litter sweep runs Sept. 15-29

RALEIGH – Before you get busy raking leaves this fall, join groups of volunteers from across North Carolina in keeping the state beautiful. The N.C. Department of Transportation’s Adopt-A-Highway program kicks off its Fall Litter Sweep on Sept. 15, and will run through Sept. 29.

Volunteers are provided cleanup supplies such as orange trash bags (reversible to blue for recyclables), gloves and orange safety vests from local NCDOT county maintenance offices. Last year’s fall litter sweep removed 76,995 pounds of litter from roads and highways. Click here to join the Litter Sweep effort.

“Our state is a more beautiful place thanks to the thousands of volunteers who give of their time every year,” says David Harris, Roadside Environmental Engineer. “This is a great opportunity to get outside with friends and family to really make a difference in our communities.”

Volunteers from local businesses, schools, non-profits and community groups work alongside NCDOT to help keep North Carolina’s roadways clean throughout the year. Adopt-A-Highway groups are encouraged to participate in the biannual litter sweeps in the spring and fall, helping to increase cleanup and encourage the community to be good stewards of the environment.

Started in 1988, the Adopt-A-Highway Program helps decrease the amount of litter on the state’s roadsides and improves the environmental beauty, quality and safety while saving taxpayer money. Roadsides can be adopted in all 100 North Carolina counties. Similarly to the annual litter sweep, groups commit to cleaning their designated roadways at least four times a year and are provided supplies by NCDOT. In 2017, more than 50,000 Adopt-A-Highway volunteers removed more than 1 million pounds of litter from more than 10,000 miles of state roadways.

Businesses, individuals and other organizations can also participate in the state’s Sponsor-A-Highway initiative. In return for sponsoring a one-mile stretch of highway, sponsors have their organization’s name or logo attached to the Sponsor-A-Highway sign.

Visit the Adopt-A-Highway or Sponsor-A-Highway websites for more information or to apply. Questions regarding the programs or applications can be directed to Kim Wheeless at 919-707-2974.

***NCDOT***

Adapted by IRPO– NCDOT Releases Key Regional Projects Expected to Be Funded for $2.7 Billion

ASHEVILLE/SYLVA– The N.C. Department of Transportation today identified 138 regional highway, aviation, ferry, rail and transit projects it anticipates funding and scheduling for construction over the next decade. The evaluation of 915 regional impact projects across the state identified the top-scoring projects to be programmed for construction in the forthcoming 2020-2029 State Transportation Improvement Plan (STIP). They include 115 highway projects programmed for $2.4 billion in funding, seven rail projects for $96 million, three ferry projects for $26 million, and three transit projects for $191 million.

Two regional projects will be programmed for construction in Isothermal RPO region (McDowell, Polk and Rutherford counties) and they are:

  • R-2597A–Widen US 221 to multi-lanes from north of Roper Loop Road to Nanney Town Road in Rutherford County
  • R-5880–Improve the intersection of US 221 and Coxe Road in Rutherford County

The Strategic Transportation Investments (STI) law established a data-driven process for ranking transportation projects in three categories: Statewide Mobility, Regional Impact, and Division Needs. In April, NCDOT identified 77 Statewide Mobility projects that will share 40 percent of the state’s available project funds.  All projects were ranked according to data scores based on safety, congestion reduction, cost-benefit analysis and other criteria.

The remaining 60 percent of the funds available over the next 10 years will be divided equally between the other two categories:  Regional Impact projects, announced today, and Division Needs (local) projects, which will be announced in December.  The regional and division project rankings combine data scores with local input points assigned by local planning organizations and NCDOT engineers.  Regional projects that did not score high enough can be considered for possible funding in the Division category.

NCDOT and local planning organizations received public comment on all projects in May and early June. In the coming weeks, each of NCDOT’s 14 divisions will receive additional public comment on Division needs, project rankings, and priorities.

More information about the STIP development process, including lists of projects, ranked high enough to win funding at the Statewide Mobility and Regional Impact levels, is available on the NCDOT website. To see details and data scores for all 2,100 statewide, regional and division projects evaluated in April, download this spreadsheet.

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Shared by IRPO–This Week at NCDOT: School Bus Safety and Laws

 

RALEIGH – The following are highlights from this week at the N.C. Department of Transportation. The stories below are also featured in NCDOT Now, the department’s weekly newscast.

School Bus Safety for Students

With school starting in many districts next week, it’s important for parents to help their children stay safe at bus stops and for drivers to know the rules of the road. Since 2016, two children have been killed at bus stops.

Parents can help by teaching their children to follow some important safety rules when getting on and off the bus this year.
•    When on the way to the bus stop, always walk on the sidewalk. if there isn’t one, stay out of the street;
•    While at the bus stop, wait quietly in a safe place away from the road and don’t run or play;
•    Always cross the street in front of the bus, never go behind it. if you drop something, tell the driver before you move to pick it up; and
•    Respect the danger zone by staying ten steps away from the bus and where the driver can see you.

It’s also good to remind students to talk quietly while on the bus so the driver won’t become distracted and keep the bus aisles clear.

School Bus Passing Laws

Students aren’t the only ones who need to understand the importance of school bus safety. On average, there are nearly 3,000 incidents of cars passing stopped school buses every school day in North Carolina. Not only is this incredibly dangerous for students, but it’s also against the law.

Drivers need to remember that…
•    On a two-lane road, all traffic from both directions must stop;
•    On a two-lane road with a center turning lane, all traffic must come to a stop;
•    When on a four-lane road without a median, traffic from both directions has to stop;
•    In the case of a divided highway with four or more lanes, only traffic following the school bus needs to stop; and
•    When on a road with four lanes or more with a center turning lane, just traffic following the bus must stop.

Penalties for passing a stopped school bus include a $500 fine and an additional four insurance points which will increase insurance rates by 80 percent. It’s imperative that drivers also slow down and obey the posted speed limit in a school zone – a child’s life could depend on it.

For more information about NCDOT Now, contact the NCDOT Communications Office at (919) 707-2660. Additional news stories from throughout the week can be found on NCDOT.gov.

***NCDOT***

Shared by IRPO–Inspection Closing One Lane of I-26 Bridge

Welding tests to be done next week on Green River Bridge

MILLS RIVER – A contractor for the N.C. Department of Transportation will close one lane of the Green River Bridge on Interstate 26 in Henderson County during midday hours on Aug. 28-30 in order to conduct a maintenance operation.

The left lane of I-26 East will close at 8:30 a.m. on Tuesday. All lanes of the eastbound bridge will remain open from 6-8:30 a.m.

Once the routine welding tests are completed on that span, crews from S&ME will move to the I-26 West bridge. Both lanes of the westbound bridge will remain open from 4-6:30 p.m.

For real-time travel information, visit DriveNC.gov or follow NCDOT on Twitter.

***NCDOT***